Making life taste better

Monthly archive for November 2012

Muscle & joint health

Several claims have been authorised for muscle and joint health. These include:-

Health claim – ‘contributes to…’
Normal muscle function Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, vitamin D*
Growth in muscle mass Protein
The maintenance of muscle mass Protein
The maintenance of normal connective tissue Copper
The formation of normal connective tissue Manganese
Normal sulphur amino-acid metabolism Molybdenum
*A claim may be made for a single nutrient or several nutrients

Glucosamine, chondroitin and fish oils do not have claims authorised in this area but are widely used with joint health in the mind of the consumer, and may materialise in the future.

 

 

 

Nutrition claims & conditions governing their use

LOW ENERGY

ENERGY-REDUCED

ENERGY-FREE

LOW FAT

FAT-FREE

LOW SATURATED FAT

SATURATED FAT-FREE

LOW SUGAR

SUGAR-FREE

WITH NO ADDED SUGARS

LOW SODIUM/SALT

VERY LOW SODIUM/SALT

SODIUM-FREE or SALT-FREE

SOURCE OF FIBRE

HIGH FIBRE

SOURCE OF PROTEIN

HIGH PROTEIN

SOURCE OF (NAME OF VITAMIN/S) and/or (NAME OF MINERAL/S)

HIGH (NAME OF VITAMIN/S) and/or (NAME OF MINERAL/S)

CONTAINS (NAME OF THE NUTRIENT OR OTHER SUBSTANCE)

INCREASED (NAME OF THE NUTRIENT)

REDUCED (NAME OF THE NUTRIENT)

LIGHT/LITE

NATURALLY/NATURAL

SOURCE OF OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

HIGH OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS

HIGH MONOUNSATURATED FAT

HIGH POLYUNSATURATED FAT

HIGH UNSATURATED FAT

One-fifth of shoppers ‘rarely or never read food labels’

foodlabe

Just nine per cent of UK shoppers always read the ingredients label on their food shopping.

foodlabeThat’s the finding of new research by Canadean Consumer, which also reveals that while 32 per cent of consumers ‘often’ read the ingredients list, 21 per cent ‘rarely’ or ‘never’ read the ingredients.

This, says the market research company, means many shoppers are unfamiliar with ingredients such as DHA, stevia and taurine.

Women (44 per cent) are more likely than men (39 per cent) to ‘always’ or ‘often’ read the ingredients list on products they buy – in fact, 26 per cent of males ‘never’ or ‘rarely’ read the ingredients list, compared to only 17 per cent of females.

This difference may imply that women are generally more health-conscious than their male counterparts, and are specifically using ingredient information as a means of guiding their healthy product choices.

Moreover, the study revealed that consumers from a higher social status are more likely to check ingredients lists always or often (44 per cent) compared to consumers from a lower social status (38 per cent).

“Consumers from lower social status groups may be less likely to deviate from regular product purchases as a result of tighter budget constraints,” suggests Canadean Consumer research manager Alex Wilman. “When it comes to checking ingredients, consumers are more likely to do so with unfamiliar products. As a result, consumers from higher social status groups may therefore check ingredients more frequently.”

Everyday ingredients such as salt, caffeine and olive oil are familiar to virtually all consumers, regardless of whether they check the ingredients list on a product or not. Awareness of newer and more specialist ingredients, such as DHA, stevia and taurine, however, relies more heavily on consumers reading labels.

“With only nine per cent of consumers always checking the ingredients on products they buy, awareness levels of ‘less-common’ ingredients may stay low,” adds Wilman.